Our Headquarters

The Broom Corn Building

In 2010, our organization’s search for a home was found in 1407 Fleet Street, Baltimore, the “Broom Corn Building.” Thanks to a generous benefactor, we were able to purchase and renovate this amazing building, respecting its unique history whilst incorporating as many elements of green sustainable building practices as possible and working with Feng Shui principles.  

This 1913 renovated soap factory stands at the intersection of divergent neighborhoods – Harbor East, the new “ground central” of Baltimore that is a vibrant business/residential/retail waterfront development; Perkins Homes, a low socio-economic housing project; Little Italy and Fells Point, both well-established row home neighborhoods; and the economically challenged areas of East Baltimore. The building is strategically located less than three miles from the Johns Hopkins medical and school of public health campus, the University of Maryland medical and professional schools campus, and Mercy, Bay View, and Harbor hospitals. We are also within an hour’s drive of both the National Institutes of Health and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Given our many research projects and collaborations over the years, this proximity has been instrumental in the success of our programs.

From this vantage point, we’ve been able nurture strategic partnerships and connect with our diverse local community. It has also enhanced the physical setting of our workdays and our ability to collaborate, helped us nurture our Scholars and Fellows program, and expanded our  capacity to host forums, trainings, and lectures.   

Our ground floor space includes a state-of-the-art demonstration kitchen and an incredible event and exhibition space, while our offices and meeting spaces are located on the third floor. We currently lease open spaces on the first and second floors.   

As we look to the future of this unique space, we are actively exploring ways it might be used to bring together like-minded organizations, nonprofits, and practitioners working on innovations in health and healing to benefit the community.  

street view of a brick warehouse with a sign that says broom corn on the front
painted white text on brick building that says broom corn
icon of map marker

Address

1407 Fleet St. Baltimore, MD 21231 Directions and parking

Developing safety, persistence, trust

Healing is facilitated through safety, persistence, and trust.

  • Persistence: “People did not simply progress through this sequence and experience healing. The healing journey was a recursive, back and forth process. They found helpers, used the skills/resources that those helpers provided, found other helpers that provided more resources and used those skills and resources. As this process continued, people experienced a gradual amelioration of their suffering. Although many despaired at times, all demonstrated the quality of persistence—they refused to give up.”
  • Safety & Trust: “To connect to helpers, it was essential for people to feel safe in those relationships and able to trust that the person would be a helper and not a barrier to healing. Persons whose wounds included a violation of trust were especially careful about testing the safety of new relationships.”

Acquiring Resources

Resources support us as we heal. They include reframing, responsibility, and positivity. “Making connections enabled participants to acquire and refine resources and skills that were essential in their healing journey. People also brought their own personal strengths to the journey.”

  • Reframing: “A particularly important skill was the ability to reframe—that is to look at suffering through a different lens.” This does NOT mean minimizing trauma or pain, but rather it often means the opposite: understanding what happened was wrong, unfair, or uncontrollable and that we are not to blame for it.
    • “I think I kept trying to convince him I was crazy. And he kept saying, ‘No, you’re not crazy.’ […] You wouldn’t necessarily say a Vietnam Vet was crazy. You’d say they are responding like you’d expect to extraordinary circumstances.”
    • “I’m not the only one who have [sic] this problem. A lots, millions of people, you know. […] They don’t have nothing to do with that. I guess I have to live.”
  • Responsibility: While we don’t have control over what happened to us, we are the only ones who can help ourselves heal. “A third essential resource that people acquired or refined was the ability to take an appropriate amount of responsibility for their healing journeys. They participated actively in the process of healing. Once again, some participants already had developed this skill, and some acquired or refined it from their helpers.”
    “You need a lot of energy and a lot of work … it takes a lot of work. It doesn’t just happen. It’s not like a magic wand.” This patient understood that they had to actively participate in the healing process.
  • Positivity: “Another resource that people acquired or refined during their healing journey was choose to be positive—that is to have some optimism about their situation.” People have varying predispositions to positivity. In the study, positivity was important in helping people heal. This doesn’t mean a toxic positivity, but rather simply finding some good in life and feeling hopeful about our situations.

Helping Relationships

“Connection to others was an essential part of all the healing journeys.” Humans are social creatures, and even the most introverted of us need close relationships. Friends and family add meaning and value to life and help support us, in good times and bad. When we experience relational trauma, relationships can feel scary, but reestablishing safety and trust in relationships is where the healing happens. (To be clear, we do not mean reestablishing safety and trust with abusers, but rather finding other healing relationships.) “When safety and trust had been established, people were able to connect with helpers. The nature of the behaviours of helpers that fostered healing ranged from small acts of kindness to unconditional love.”

  • “Moving from being wounded, through suffering to healing, is possible. It is facilitated by developing safe, trusting relationships and by positive reframing that moves through the weight of responsibility to the ability to respond.”
  • “Relationships with health professionals were among these but were not necessarily any more important to the healing journey than other kinds of helpers, which included family members, friends, spirituality and their God, pets, support groups, administrators, case workers and supervisors.”

Healing

Healing probably means different things to different people, but one definition that emerged from the study is: “The re-establishment of a sense of integrity and wholeness.” Healing was an emergent property that resulted from each individuals’ complex healing journey, a result of bridged connections between resources and relationships. Healing, in this sense, does not mean cured—none of the study participants were cured of their ailments—”but all developed a sense of integrity and wholeness despite ongoing pain or other symptoms.” In varying degrees, “they were able to transcend their suffering and in some sense to flourish.” When we begin to heal, we find increased capacity for hope, renewed motivation to help others, and are more able to accept ourselves as we are.

Suffering

Suffering is the ongoing pain from wounding. There is debate about whether or not one actually needs to experience suffering on the path to healing.

Wounding

Wounding happens when we experience physical or emotional harm. It can stem from chronic illness or by physical or psychological trauma for which we do not have the tools to cope, or a combination of those factors. “The degree and quality of suffering experienced by each individual is framed by contextual factors that include personal characteristics, timing of their initial or ongoing wounding in the developmental life cycle and prior and current relationships.”